Top Causes of Dog Diarrhea

It's not a topic anyone likes to discuss, but if you have a dog, chances are you're cleaning up a stinky puddle (or more simply, "Dog diarrhea") more than you'd like to think. Dog diarrhea is a common disease in dogs and varies in frequency, duration, and intensity from dog to dog. You may not be able to completely prevent dog diarrhea, but by knowing as much as possible about it, you can limit the number of times your dog has one of these unpleasant episodes and shorten the duration of the episodes. Fortunately, there are also several over-the-counter dog diarrhea remedies for dogs.

Top Causes of Dog Diarrhea


There are significant differences between how dogs and humans digest food. The shape of the human jaw and saliva enzymes, for example, will begin to break down the bite in the mouth. Dogs, on the other hand, have mouths and jaws designed to rip, grind, and eat food. Their salivary enzymes are primarily designed to kill bacteria, so they can carry objects that would send their human companions to the hospital.


Food travels quickly through a dog's esophagus and into the stomach in chunks, where most of the digestion takes place. Stomach acids in dogs are about three times stronger than in humans, so they can digest virtually intact food. Under normal conditions, the transit time from the mouth through the small and large intestines should be less than 10 hours, eventually leading to firm, well-formed stools.


Many things can disrupt this well-balanced system, leading to dog diarrhea, or, less commonly, constipation. Some things, like eating too much weed, are not serious at all. Others can be signs of life-threatening problems, such as an indigestible object (such as a stone) stuck in the stomach, or a disease such as cancer.


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Dietary indiscretion: overeating, eating unhealthy or spoiled food. In fact, there is a name for this in veterinary circles: "waste toxicosis" or "gut waste." Diet Changes: It may take a few days for a dog's digestive system to adjust to the new proteins. This is why many dog ​​food manufacturers recommend taking your time when switching from one brand to another.


The texture and color of dog diarrhea say a lot about the cause of the problem and what's going on with your dog. Be very careful to note color, texture, and anything else that may help when describing symptoms to the veterinarian. In many cases, diarrhea resolves after a few days of home treatment, but it's a good idea to see a veterinarian if it persists for a long time or if it has any of several signs that could indicate a serious problem.


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This infographic from Purina gives you an idea of ​​the "perfect shit," chocolate brown, log-shaped, compact, and easy to collect. It should look like cookie dough or plasticine, experts say.


Large volumes, a pudding-like or watery consistency, traces of mucus (like jelly), or streaks of blood are not normal. Color can also say a lot about what's going on in your dog's intestines. Chocolate brown is normal, while colors such as orange, green, or gray may indicate problems with organs such as the liver, gallbladder, or pancreas.


Black, tarry stools are very dangerous and may indicate internal bleeding. If you see this, contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. Purina also provided a helpful link: the dog poop color wheel.


The color, shape, and texture will help you and your veterinarian figure out what's wrong when your dog has diarrhea. These factors will help the veterinarian determine the source of the problem in the dog's gastrointestinal tract. Small amounts with force, several times an hour, what some people call "splashing", can be a sign of colon inflammation. Three or four times with a large volume indicate a disorder of the small intestine.


Hard objects that are unusual in shape or color can tell you what your dog likes. For example, several small white rice-like forms may indicate a tapeworm infection. Grass, wood, or rope can tell you that your dog ate something he couldn't digest. Consistency: Purina Pro Plan Veterinary Diets developed this beautifully illustrated chart showing how veterinarians can achieve consistency in dog poop on a scale of 1 to 7.


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As disgusting as it sounds, it's important to carefully examine your dog's feces if he has diarrhea so that you can provide as many details as possible to the veterinarian. With this knowledge, your veterinarian will be able to tell you whether to schedule and see him or if you can treat him at home.


A great many cases are mild and, on the advice of a veterinarian, can be treated without an office visit. These treatments are good to have on hand and can be ordered online for fast delivery. Fasting from food for 12 to 24 hours and frequent small amounts of water can eliminate the cause of the disorder and stabilize the gastrointestinal tract. This is usually the first line of attack for diarrhea.


Before you decide to fast, make sure your dog is healthy enough to handle it. Puppies and older dogs, for example, need nutrients. Also, fasting may not be appropriate for small dogs that lack the physical reserves of their larger counterparts.

Dogs Diarrhea


  • Diarrhea can lead to dehydration, so always give your dog access to water. You can also offer unflavored Pedialyte to help maintain electrolyte balance on the advice of a veterinarian.
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  • After quick, simple foods are usually introduced slowly. Many dog ​​owners start with a food that acts as a binder, which helps improve stool consistency.
  • Rice Water: Boil high-quality rice in plenty of water, remove the grains and serve the remaining creamy white soup to your dog. A little broth or some baby food will make it more delicious.


Pumpkin (100% grocery store pumpkin puree, pumpkin powder, or canned pumpkin for dogs) has a strange feature: it's effective for both diarrhea and constipation. If you can't get a pure pumpkin, pumpkin powder made specifically for pets is a good alternative. White yogurt with active cultures can help dogs who are intolerant to milk and dairy products. Specially formulated dog foods: Some manufacturers offer stomach-sensitive dog foods that can relieve stomach problems.


You may need to take some of them to the vet. Over-the-counter medications for humans can also be effective for diarrhea in dogs, but they should be administered with caution and you should always check with your veterinarian before using them.


What works for one dog may not work for another, so some experimentation may be required to find the right formula. It's also helpful to write down what worked and what didn't, so you know what to do the next time you find yourself in a mess.


Once you've found a recovery diet that works for your dog and doesn't cause relapses, you can gradually increase portions over a few days and then start adding small amounts of your dog's regular food until everything returns to normal. The right time to visit the veterinarian largely depends on what is normal for your dog. Unfortunately, some dogs are more prone to indigestion than others, so you need to be very careful about unusual things on a case-by-case basis.


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